“12 Rules For Life” Series, Part 7

I am halfway ashamed to admit that this is the last chapter I will be able to write about from memory. For a whole lot of not good enough reasons I put down this book and started this blog post series partially as a way to force myself to finish it. Even with the zero people I am convinced read my blog posts I still feel some form of responsibility to these posts.

Odd as it is, I think this chapter is the reason as to why I keep this up. Rule number 7 in 12 rules for life is ” pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)”. I feel this can be broken down to be a little easier to understand by saying ” the easiest option isn’t always what’s best”. Something I am reminding myself of very frequently, as of late.

The longer Colin and I continue this journey, the stronger I feel that this is what I am supposed to be doing. But also, the longer we stick with this the more difficult it becomes. We spend more money, invest more time, try harder and do more things. All of this done with the idea that we will eventually be able to do this ALL the time. To do this AS our jobs. And the longer all of that continues, obviously the harder it gets. But on Saturdays, when I’m in the chair in the studio sitting next to Offie and providing information that people are asking for and exposing political ties I feel people need to see, I know this is what I should be doing.

I spend 45 hours, roughly, a week doing the auditory research for this show. On top of that I read all of the articles that I do, put together all of my notes for the show, semi-manage our social media, and then show up on Saturday to do the show, all on top of the personal and family things I need to get done, (did I mention I have baby on the way?). When I don’t want to hear anymore about political dissidents being killed or entire groups of people being dismissed by others, don’t want to talk for 3 hours or do anything besides sit in my MeUndies, smoke weed and play Madden, I have to take a step back and remember that the easy path is not always the best.

In all of the interviews I have heard with athletes and millionaires, business men and musicians, none of them ever said it was easy. A lot of them will give credit to luck or to God or the other people around them that helped them get there because no one does it alone, but none of them ever say it was easy. Even regular people who own a small business or even just become manager somewhere that they love, the journey is almost never easy.

Everyone is provided with opportunities on their path to quit or to undercut someone or just in general take the easy way out, but that will always come back to bite you. Even if everything works out for you, on the whole, because you have taken those easy breaks and gained from them, at the end of the day you did not allow yourself to take hold of the true opportunity to learn a work ethic strong enough to get you to your goals. If something DOES happen that places you in a spot of adversity and your easy breaks no longer benefit you, you will not have the will to stick with something long enough and to work through the muck and the grime to get to the real prize.

This rule in the end I think is one that most people know but, like me, could stand to be reminded of everyone once in a while. It can be hard for a lot of people, especially in this new generation, to be able to see that work is not the point of life. While the work ethic is one of the main benefits from struggling through adversity it is not the true goal. There is a balance between work and play that can be hard to strike and can be slightly different for everyone, but I have no issue with saying that no matter what your journey, no matter what your path, on your way to the goal pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.